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Originally published in the Washington Post Ice is melting in unprecedented ways as summer approaches in the Arctic. In recent days, observations have revealed a record-challenging melt event over the Greenland ice sheet, while the extent of ice over the Arctic Ocean has never been this low in mid-June during the age of weather satellites. Greenland saw temperatures soar up to 40 degrees Fahrenheit above normal Wednesday, while open water exists in places north of…

Originally published on Weather.com Scientists studying climate change expected layers of permafrost in the Canadian Arctic to melt by the year 2090. Instead, it’s happening now. A new study published this week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters revealed that unusually warm summers in the Canadian High Arctic between 2003 and 2016 resulted in permafrost melt up to 240% higher than previous years. Louise Farquharson, a researcher at the Permafrost Laboratory at the University of Alaska Fairbanks…

Originally published on UN Global Impact On 17 May, the UN Global Compact Academy hosted a special briefing on how business leaders can get involved in the lead-up to the UN Climate Summit 2019 — and beyond — in order to support ambitious political outcomes towards a just, resilient and zero-carbon future. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h08fzTk_vx0&feature=youtu.be Speakers include: UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy, Ambassador Luis Alfonso De AlbaLise Kingo, CEO and Executive Director of the UN Global CompactPaul…

Originally published in National Geographic by Alejandra Barunda CITIES CAN PLAY a major role in the global effort to curb climate change, a new report says—and a major step they can take is helping their inhabitants consume a whole lot less stuff by making changes in the way cities are run. Even the most forward-thinking cities have a long way to go to neutralize their carbon emissions, the report says. That’s partly because for years, cities…

Originally published in the NY Times Opinion, written by Nicholas Kristoff To understand why President Trump’s new sanctions and other flailing to end Central American immigration aren’t working, step into the dark, melancholy hovel of Ana Jorge Jorge. She lives in Guatemala’s western highlands in the hillside village of Canquintic, near the town of Nentón, and she’s a widow because of the American dream. Her husband, Mateo Gómez Tadeo, borrowed thousands of dollars and migrated…

Originally Published in the Carbon Brief Dr Karsten Haustein and Dr Friederike Otto are scientists at the University of Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute; Zeke Hausfather is the US analyst for Carbon Brief; Peter Jacobs is a PhD student at George Mason University. The role of variability due to natural ocean cycles in global warming is a long-standing debate in climate science. The scientific community overwhelmingly agrees that human activities are responsible for the observed increase in temperatures for the last half-century. However, the relative influences of natural…

Originally published in Forbes by Scott Amyx As part of the United Nations 2030 Agenda, the U.N. General Assembly has set forth the 17 global sustainable development goals (SDGs) to address poverty, hunger, health, education, gender equality, clean water, clean energy, economic growth, industry, inequality, cities, production, climate change, oceans, land, justice and partnerships. It’s estimated that achieving the SDGs would require $2–3 trillion per year for the next 15 years. Ironically, the global cost of corruption…

Published first on Harvard Business Review As concerns about scarcity and inequality become increasingly urgent, many investors are eager to generate both business and social returns—to “do well by doing good.” One avenue is impact investing: directing capital to ventures that are expected to yield social and environmental benefits as well as profits. But there’s a problem: Although the business world has several universally accepted tools, such as the internal rate of return, for estimating…

Originally Published in Time Magazine by Markham Heid Plastic contamination is rampant in bottled water. That was the unsettling conclusion of a study published last year in Frontiers in Chemistry that analyzed samples taken from 259 bottled waters sold in several countries and found that 93% of them contained “microplastic” synthetic polymer particles. Many of those particles weren’t all that small. “Some were definitely visible without a magnifying glass or microscope,” says Sherri Mason, author of the study and…

Originally Published in Green Prophet image from WikiMedia Watergen, an Israel-based innovative company that creates clean water out of air is now providing a source of freshwater for over 120 children living in an orphanage in Uzbekistan’s city of Bukhara. We covered the company in 2015 and they are doing well! The technology comes in the form of an atmospheric water generator known as the “GEN-350,” which can produce up to 900 liters of water per…