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Originally published in the World Economic Forum Johnny Wood Scientists from Israel and neighboring Arab countries are joining forces to save Red Sea coral reefs from the threat of climate change. The alliance is the brainchild of Moaz Fine, an Israeli professor at Tel Aviv’s Bar-Ilan University, who invited marine experts from the countries that border the Red Sea to collaborate at a new research centre. The team will comprise representatives from Israel, Eritrea, Jordan…

Originally published in the World Economic Forum by Emma Charlton The impact of overfishing is wide-ranging. It’s a cause of degraded ecosystems, according to the WWF, and affects the size of the fish left behind, as well as how they reproduce and the speed at which they mature. When too many fish are removed from one particular spot, the resulting imbalances can kill off other marine life, including sea turtles and corals. There’s also an economic…

Originally published in Forbes, written by Trevor Nace Ambitious dreams have now become a reality as the Ocean Cleanup deploys its $20 million system designed to clean up the 1.8 trillion pieces of trash floating in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Check out another Forbes piece on how Ocean Cleanup aims to reuse and recycle the ocean plastic. The floating boom system was deployed on Saturday from San Francisco Bay and will undergo several weeks of testing before being hauled…

Originally Published on the NY Post Well, here’s one way to cut down on personal debt. Humans are gobbling up around 5 grams of microplastics in their weekly diets — or about as much as your ATM card, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Newcastle, Australia, and commissioned by the World Wildlife Fund for Nature. “For the first time, this study offers precise estimations on the amounts of plastic ingested…

Originally published in the Washington Post Ice is melting in unprecedented ways as summer approaches in the Arctic. In recent days, observations have revealed a record-challenging melt event over the Greenland ice sheet, while the extent of ice over the Arctic Ocean has never been this low in mid-June during the age of weather satellites. Greenland saw temperatures soar up to 40 degrees Fahrenheit above normal Wednesday, while open water exists in places north of…

Originally published on Weather.com Scientists studying climate change expected layers of permafrost in the Canadian Arctic to melt by the year 2090. Instead, it’s happening now. A new study published this week in the journal Geophysical Research Letters revealed that unusually warm summers in the Canadian High Arctic between 2003 and 2016 resulted in permafrost melt up to 240% higher than previous years. Louise Farquharson, a researcher at the Permafrost Laboratory at the University of Alaska Fairbanks…

Originally published on UN Global Impact On 17 May, the UN Global Compact Academy hosted a special briefing on how business leaders can get involved in the lead-up to the UN Climate Summit 2019 — and beyond — in order to support ambitious political outcomes towards a just, resilient and zero-carbon future. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h08fzTk_vx0&feature=youtu.be Speakers include: UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy, Ambassador Luis Alfonso De AlbaLise Kingo, CEO and Executive Director of the UN Global CompactPaul…

Originally published in National Geographic by Alejandra Barunda CITIES CAN PLAY a major role in the global effort to curb climate change, a new report says—and a major step they can take is helping their inhabitants consume a whole lot less stuff by making changes in the way cities are run. Even the most forward-thinking cities have a long way to go to neutralize their carbon emissions, the report says. That’s partly because for years, cities…

Originally published in the NY Times Opinion, written by Nicholas Kristoff To understand why President Trump’s new sanctions and other flailing to end Central American immigration aren’t working, step into the dark, melancholy hovel of Ana Jorge Jorge. She lives in Guatemala’s western highlands in the hillside village of Canquintic, near the town of Nentón, and she’s a widow because of the American dream. Her husband, Mateo Gómez Tadeo, borrowed thousands of dollars and migrated…

Originally Published in the Carbon Brief Dr Karsten Haustein and Dr Friederike Otto are scientists at the University of Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute; Zeke Hausfather is the US analyst for Carbon Brief; Peter Jacobs is a PhD student at George Mason University. The role of variability due to natural ocean cycles in global warming is a long-standing debate in climate science. The scientific community overwhelmingly agrees that human activities are responsible for the observed increase in temperatures for the last half-century. However, the relative influences of natural…